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Top 10 Horror Movies on Netflix

top 10 horror movies on netflix

Here is the list of most rated horror movies on Netflix:

So, it looks like we’ve gone around in a circle with this one. This list starts and ends with Mike Flanagan’s best work, but what separates this one from the others on the list are the intricate layers of complexity that are woven throughout the narrative.

The most recent installment in Flanagan’s trilogy is jam-packed with content, from its spot-on depictions of Catholic and Muslim ideology to its enthralling twists and turns. Riley Flynn is followed by Midnight Mass on his journey back to Crockett Island from the mainland. At the same time, a strange new priest appears on the island and assumes control of the church.

This priest appears to have the ability to do miracles. Midnight Mass stands out above other films of its time because it is seven hours of uninterrupted suspense and wonder and manages to be both tragic and scary at the same time, as well as dark yet hopeful, terrifying, and reassuring. Do not, we beseech you, let this one pass you by; it is a terrifying masterpiece that will be discussed for many years to come. Please don’t miss out on this one.

Netflix presented a brand new horror movie during the height of the outbreak that was not only topical but also familiar with the tried and true conventions of the zombie genre.

#Alive is a zombie survival thriller set in the modern-day, and it seems firmly based on our globally shared experience of isolation during the pandemic lockdowns. The plot of the Korean horror film jumps right into the action, focusing on a young man (Yoo Ah-in) who is stranded in his apartment by himself after the outbreak of a zombie plague and following his attempts to survive his newfound confinement while maintaining his sanity.

The film wastes no time getting to the action. #Alive does not exactly break the mold of zombie thrillers, but it is a tightly-constructed thrilling treat with some of the best zombie transformation scenes in recent memory, and that despondent sense of isolation (along with the internal strength it takes to overcome it) makes it stand out as a unique entry in the zombie canon that feels pitched exactly to the anxieties of 2020. – Haleigh Foutch.

It tracks Detroit’s ghosts. David Robert Mitchell’s horrific film only makes sense if you’ve never been to these places. I recognize it, though. Mitchell uses archaic colors, muted yet surprisingly sumptuous music, and continuous anachronistic references.

“It Follows” is a horror film with an isolated plot and mushy, childlike characters. Mitchell predicts this will happen again. The aesthetic flourishes and circular pans wouldn’t work if Mitchell wasn’t so intent on making an unsettling film, but they bring to life the most morbid image: someone slowly emerging from the background, from one’s dreams, and walking toward you, as if Death were to appear unannounced next to you in public, ready to steal your breath.

Initial comments suggest Mitchell’s picture is an attempt to conceal conservative sexual politics beneath normal horror movie clichés, but it does little to enhance our preconceived notion of a slasher flick. Isn’t it brash, loveless sin? This film isn’t Judd Apatow’s first comparison. Mitchell never criticizes his characters for doing what most teens aspire to; instead, he uses teenage sex as a metaphor.

You share a portion of your body with anyone with whom your partner has sex. Mitchell lacks principles. It Follows is a horrifying coming-of-age story lifted from a disguised moral play by its director’s regard and empathy for characters who, in any other horror movie, would be cruel fodder.

Mitchell knows that the small off-kilter every day is creepy because our thoughts play games on us while we’re not paying attention. We are horrified by the dread that hides just outside our awareness until it abruptly appears, informing us we have no control over our fate and will never be safe. There’s It Follows’ terror. It follows is about more than teenage sex and growing up.

It Comes at Night is the type of widespread horror anthology that you might be seeking because it has a cast full of famous actors and actresses, superb direction, and a conclusion that will keep you wide awake. It Comes At Night is a post-apocalyptic film that takes place after an infectious disease has decimated the earth.

In contrast to other films of the same genre, It Comes At Night focuses on the human element of the situation. Although the suspense builds gradually throughout the film, it ultimately proves to be one of the most gripping and unsettling movies produced throughout the COVID era.

It Comes at Night is the type of widespread horror anthology that you might be seeking because it has a cast full of famous actors and actresses, superb direction, and a conclusion that will keep you wide awake.

It Comes At Night is a post-apocalyptic film that takes place after an infectious disease has decimated the earth. In contrast to other films of the same genre, It Comes At Night focuses on the human element of the situation. Although the suspense builds gradually throughout the film, it ultimately proves to be one of the most gripping and unsettling movies produced throughout the COVID era.

Many will consider ending I’m considering ending things soon after starting. Cross-dissolve pictures show the interior of a farmhouse, apartment, or interior. An unseen woman tells us something without context mid-narration. It’s awkward. Uneven. Movies shouldn’t function like this.

Jessie Buckley’s character finally appears. We’re in a 3-D snow globe with her as she stands in the street while snowflakes fall. She glances at a second-story window. A man looks out a window. Jesse Plemons peers out a window. In the next scene, Jesse Plemmons picks up Jessie Buckley.

The movie music shimmers. Jessie Buckley’s Lucy or Amy wants to break up with Jake. Things won’t go well, it appears. Jake drives and sometimes talks; his behavior seems consistent until a gesture emerges from another ego. Louisa or Lucy is friendly, knowledgeable, and interested.

When she slows or is quiet, she becomes someone else with different memories and interests. She’s a painter, physicist, and neither sometimes. The twins are awesome. Their performances and characteristics are vague. The best film of 2020 is a bad film. It avoids typical patterns, rhythms, and tropes. It doesn’t even try to be a great movie; it just dissects the other’s mind in any way possible.

The film’s self-awareness could have been unbearable, but awareness (and our fragmentary experience of it) is its entire point. The film rejects the platitude that it accepts life’s beauty and ugliness. “Love conquers all” is an understatement. These false truths flit around the film’s periphery: welcome illusions or ghosts.

Thomas Richardson makes his way to a deserted island off the coast of Wales to save his kidnapped sister, but once he gets there, he discovers that something much more sinister is taking place on the island. If you enjoyed the cult antics of movies like Midsommar and The Wicker Man, then Apostle, which was directed by Gareth Evans, should be the next film on your viewing schedule.

In the film Apostle, starring Dan Stevens (Beauty and the Beast) and Lucy Boynton (Bohemian Rhapsody), there is some of the most unsettling violence, as well as an assortment of just plain negative vibes, which are presented in a manner that is both beautiful and chaotic. Candidates with fragile stomachs need not apply.

1BR shows the isolation and misery in Los Angeles during the housing crisis. Hollywood and its environs may be known for affluence, yet most of Los Angeles county lives near the poverty line. Extreme poverty comes with nearly two dozen cults posing as a subculture, a mortifying picture of co-dependency, and loneliness.

Sarah (Nicole Brydon Bloom), a new LA resident, seeks a home. She must attend college. Sarah must also deal with her overbearing supervisor. She’s a late-20s role model. She discovers the right place after a nightmarish apartment hunt with a limited budget. It’s reasonable, convenient to work, and has a cute neighbor. Unfortunately, a sect intent on creating a perfect community owns the land.

Extremely paranoid, CDE Properties oversees the colony around-the-clock. Sleep deprivation, solitary confinement, and pain threats are used to convert new renters. Sarah resists while assuring her captors she’s joining them. David Marmor’s feature film debut is a terrifying survival drama in the desert and bright offices. 1BR is a visceral statement of dread and longing. 1BR aspires high with great performances, a twist, and a possible sequel. The film mostly succeeds.

After being removed from the main film series, the Scream series turns out to be quite a pleasant surprise, with all of its hallmarks: teen drama, allusions to classic horror films, and quite a few deaths.

That’s not to say it doesn’t have a compelling story to tell, even if it doesn’t contain the ghostface or voice of its most recognisable characters until the third season. This is a great series to return and reassess, especially if you’re looking forward to the upcoming Scream, which is due to premiere in January of this year.

Hill Mansion is based on Shirley Jackson’s iconic 1959 novel of the same name and tells the narrative of the Crain family’s interaction with the titular haunted house throughout their tragic past.

Written by Mike Flanagan, a name you should get used to hearing, and starring Victoria Pedretti from “You” and Kate Siegel from “Midnight Mass,” “The Haunting of Hill House” is a modern-day horror classic reimagined for today’s audiences. Keeping a supply of tissues on hand is essential.

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